bio

Roberley Bell’s artistic work is inspired by nature and time. Her practice draws on the world around her, in particular the scrutiny of nature and the built environment. She spent her childhood in Latin America and Southeast Asia and holds an MFA from SUNY - Alfred. She is the recipient of many fellowships including the New York Foundation for the Arts, a Pollock Krasner Fellowship, and a Senior Scholar Fulbright to Turkey. Her Fulbright project The City as The Site of Intervention resulted in a series of projects in public spaces. Currently, a Fulbright specialist leading walking workshops internationally; recent workshops have been held in Sharjah, UAE, Istanbul, Turkey and Malmö, Sweden. She has also received several residency awards, both nationally and internationally, including Sculpture Space and the International Studio Program. She was recently awarded a residency at Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, New York and at the Electronic Print Center at Alfred University, Alfred, NY. Internationally she has had residencies at the Stadt künstlerhaus, Salzburg, Austria where she completed the book A Borrowed View, and the National Center for Contemporary Art, Kaliningrad, Russia. Bell’s work has been exhibited internationally and she has completed numerous public projects. Bell lives in rural western New York and is a professor in the College of Art and Design at Rochester Institute of Technology.

Artist Statement

As an artist, my work predominately centers on the production of sculpture and site-specific public projects. My work is inspired by nature and rooted in the art historical tradition of organic abstraction. My practice draws on the world around me, in particular the observation of nature and the built environment. My work both abstracts and borrows from the natural world to reveal hybridized forms. My sculptures are assembled of a diverse range of materials, some fabricated into distinct forms others utilized in their found state. The still life and the some thing series are small works- meditations-initially thought of as mental preparation for larger scale work.  These small works have evolved into a practice in and of itself opening new avenues for the investigation of the boundary between color, material and form, because of the scale combined with the artistic process, there is a palpable spontaneity inherent in these works-a quirkily liveliness, they are delicate amalgams of many media, thoughtfully constructed and balanced. My sculptures are embedded in the formal language of spatial composition. Color, contrasting material textures and distinctive form are the dominate features in the work. The some things and still life sculptures straddle the space between representation and abstraction.